Wednesday, July 7, 2021

How To Can Your Vegetables | Useful Cooking And Housekeeping Tips

How To Can Your Vegetables | Useful Cooking And Housekeeping Tips



CANNED VEGETABLES

Only young, tender, fresh vegetables should be canned.
Time your work by the clock, not by guess.
Weigh and measure all material accurately.
Take no risks. 
Food is too valuable.

Most fruits and vegetables require blanching; that is, all vegetables and fruits, berries excepted, should be first plunged into boiling water or steam after being picked over, and then, in turn plunged at once into very cold water.

After blanching and packing in sterilized jars, add to all vegetables salt in the proportion of a level teaspoon to the contents of a quart jar. Carrots, parsnips and sweet potatoes require a teaspoon to the pint.

Then fill jars to within quarter inch of top with boiling water, and put in hot water bath—see "Canning Fruit in a Water Bath".

Cover boiler or kettle closely and sterilize or boil for the length of time given below:
Do not close jars tight during sterilizing, or there will be no room for the generated steam and it will burst the jars.

Asparagus, Beets, Carrots, Parsnips, Peas, Sweet Potatoes, and Turnips require six minutes blanching, ninety minutes sterilizing. Asparagus requires one hundred and twenty minutes.
Corn requires five minutes blanching on the cob; three minutes sterilizing after being cut from the cob, or on the cob.

Lima or String Beans or Peas require five minutes blanching; two hours sterilizing.
Pumpkin and Squash require five minutes blanching; one and one-half hours sterilizing.
Tomatoes require two minutes blanching; twenty-two minutes sterilizing.

Tomatoes and Corn require separate blanching, time given above, then ninety minutes sterilizing together. The acid of the tomatoes aids in preserving the corn.
Corn and Beans (Succotash) require ten minutes blanching, ninety minutes sterilizing.


Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum
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Cocoanut Candy | Sweetmeat | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

Cocoanut Candy | Sweetmeat | Kosher Diet Food Recipe



Cocoanut Candy

Time—1 hour

Ingredients
1 large cocoanut
1 tablespoonful cocoanut milk
1 lb. brown sugar

Directions

Cut the cocoanut into small thin strips about half an inch long. 
Boil with the sugar and the milk from the nut, stirring all the time. 
Drop a little on to a wet board, and if it be sufficiently cooked, it will harden. 
When ready, form the mixture into round cakes with a tablespoon, and drop them on to a wet board as fast as possible.
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Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Ginger Lee | Sweetmeats | Shabbat Cooking | Kosher Diet Food Recipe


Ginger Lee | Sweetmeats | Shabbat Cooking | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

Ginger Lee 

Time—1 hour

Ingredients 
1¼ lb. ginger lee seed, 
1 lb. castor sugar, 
1 lb. honey, 
¼ lb. almonds.

Directions

Blanch the almonds and ginger lee seed the day before they are required. 
Pick the seed over well, put it into the oven until it is a light brown. 
Mix the sugar and honey well together, put them in a saucepan on the fire, let them remain till clear (about 20 minutes). 
Drop in the ginger lee seed and almonds, and stir well. 
Drop a spoonful on to a plate to see if it sets; when ready, thoroughly wet a board and rolling pin, roll out the mixture about one inch thick, cut it up, and put on a dish to cool.



Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

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Chocolate Caramels | Sweetmeats | Kosher Diet Food Recipe


Chocolate Caramels | Sweetmeats | Kosher Diet Food Recipe 

Chocolate Caramels

Time—¾ hour


Ingredients 
½ lb. grated chocolate, 
1 breakfastcupful brown sugar, 
¾ breakfastcupful milk, 
1 oz. butter, 
2 dessertspoonfuls golden syrup.

Directions

Stir all the ingredients over the fire until thick (from 20 to 30 minutes). 
When a little of the mixture, poured into cold water, becomes crisp and hard, the caramels are ready. 
Pour the mixture on to well-greased dishes, mark it into squares, and cut up as soon as possible.


Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Hints On Cleaning Kitchen Utensils - The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers

HINTS ON CLEANING KITCHEN UTENSILS

Saucepans should always be filled immediately after use, with hot water and soda. When they have stood some time, they must be scoured well, inside and out, with silver sand, well rinsed in hot water, and thoroughly dried in front of the fire. The lids must be wiped, and hung up separately.

Frying-pans should never be washed, but should be wiped thoroughly clean with soft paper immediately after use.

Tin vessels must be thoroughly washed in hot water, dried, lightly covered with whiting, and then rubbed bright with wash-leather.

Kitchen tables must be washed over with a wet cloth, sprinkled with silver sand, and thoroughly scrubbed, the way of the grain, with hot water and soda. All the sand must then be carefully wiped off with a damp cloth. Should the table be very greasy, damp fuller’s earth must be used instead of sand.

Pastry boards and wooden utensils must be washed over with a wet cloth, sprinkled with crushed soda and boiling water, then scrubbed well, the way of the grain, and dried with a cloth.

Knives must be placed in a jug, and covered with hot water as far as the haft, then wiped quite dry, cleaned with bath brick on a wooden board placed in a slanting position. When quite bright, the dust must be wiped off with a dry cloth.

The prongs of forks must be cleaned with a piece of rag dipped in bath brick.
Plates and dishes must be washed in hot water and soda, then rinsed in cold water, and left in the plate-rack to dry.


Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

The Mystery Of Pain - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts



The Mystery Of Pain - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

THE MYSTERY OF PAIN

THE mystery of pain is an old problem. The Rabbis were deeply impressed with its gravity and complexity. The sorrows of the universe and the agony of Israel; the suffering of the nation and the pain of the individual, formed the inspiration of some of their noblest thoughts. They fully realized that suffering can chasten and heal and purify, even ‘as salt cleanses meat’. And so they call God’s chastisements the blessed scourges of love, and tell us that even as the olive only gives forth its sweet and perfumed oil on being crushed, so also Israel only reaches perfection through crushing sorrows. They tell us that in the thick darkness of the world-problem is God—the ‘Light Behind’; that all things work together for good—even Death; they represent God as saying to mankind, ‘with thy very wounds I will heal thee’; they say that those whom God afflicts bear His name; that only through a ‘sorrow’s crown of sorrows’ cometh true life. Heaven is not to be won by rest and ease and quiet. Only those who have suffered and endured greatly have achieved greatly. The world’s greatest workers, thinkers, and teachers have only reached the pinnacle of fame by surmounting obstacles which to ordinary men, content with the lower slopes, would have seemed insuperable. Man has ever risen nearer to God by the altar-stairs of pain and sorrow—those altar-stairs which lead through darkness, for ever upwards, towards the very Throne of God.
S. ALFRED ADLER, 1906.



Excerpt From A Book of Jewish Thoughts By Joseph Herman Hertz

Light In Darkness - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

Light In Darkness - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

LIGHT IN DARKNESS

WHEN Adam saw for the first time the sun go down, and an ever-deepening gloom enfold creation, his mind was filled with terror. God then took pity on him, and endowed him with the divine intuition to take two stones—the name of one was Darkness and the name of the other Shadow of Death—and rub them against each other, and so discover fire. Thereupon Adam exclaimed with grateful joy: ‘Blessed be the Creator of Light’.
TALMUD.

WHENCE AND WHITHER

I

AKABYA, son of Mahalalel, said, ‘Reflect upon three things, and thou wilt not come within the power of sin: know whence thou camest, and whither thou art going, and before whom thou wilt in future have to render account and reckoning’.
ETHICS OF THE FATHERS.



II

AN old Saxon chieftain was once revelling with his boon companions in the brilliantly lighted banqueting hall, when he noticed a bird flying from end to end, and he exclaimed: ‘Even thus is our fate. Out of the darkness we come; we speed for a while through a gay and merry world, and then again into darkness we lapse.’ Ah, not so, dear Congregants! ‘The dust returneth to the earth, as it was, but the spirit returneth unto God who gave it.’ Our true essence is deathless—spirit of God’s undying Spirit, soul of His immortal Soul. If we have risen to a true conception of life and our duty, if we have proved ourselves faithful to our mission, then our end will not be a leap in the dark, but—
‘Life’s race well run,
Life’s work well done,
Life’s crown well won’:
then come rest and peace—rest with God, peace everlasting.
HERMANN ADLER, 1898.

Time And Eternity - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

Time And Eternity - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

TIME AND ETERNITY

GOD, the Source of life, has placed in our nature the blessed hope of immortality, by which we may console ourselves for the vanity of life, and overcome the dread of death. If thou art in truth of the higher sphere, why should the thought of leaving this lower region trouble thee? Especially since the very pleasures which thou seekest on earth are, in reality, but briars and thorns. Therefore seek them not. But what shouldst thou do? This: Use thy time as thou wouldst a doubtful companion: extract the good and avoid the evil. Avail thyself of the few opportunities of improvement in his company, and use thy discretion so that thou mayest suffer no injury from thy association with him. And remember that the companionship of time is but of short duration. It flies more quickly than the shades of evening. We are like a child that grasps in his hand a sunbeam. He opens his hand soon again, but, to his amazement, finds it empty and the brightness gone.
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Excerpt From A Book of Jewish Thoughts By Joseph Herman Hertz

Sayings From The Talmud - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

Sayings From The Talmud - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

SAYINGS FROM THE TALMUD

I

BE thou the cursed, not he who curses. Be of them that are persecuted, not of them that persecute. Look at Scripture: there is not a single bird more persecuted than the dove; yet God has chosen her to be offered up on His altar. The bull is hunted by the lion, the sheep by the wolf, the goat by the tiger. And God said, ‘Bring Me a sacrifice, not from them that persecute, but from them that are persecuted’.
Scripture ordains that the Hebrew slave who ‘loves’ his bondage shall have his ear pierced against the door-post (Exodus 21). Why? Because it is that ear which heard on Sinai, ‘They are My servants, they shall not be sold as bondsmen’. They are My servants, not servants’ servants. And this man voluntarily throws away his precious freedom—‘Pierce his ear!’

II

EVEN when the gates of heaven are shut to prayer, they are open to tears. Prayer is Israel’s only weapon, a weapon inherited from his fathers, a weapon tried in a thousand battles.
When the righteous man dies, it is the earth that loses. The lost jewel will always be a jewel, but the possessor who has lost it—well may he weep.
To one who denied resurrection, Gabiha ben Pasissa said: ‘If what never before existed, exists, why may not that which once existed exist again?’
Life is a passing shadow, says Scripture. Is it the shadow of a tower, of a tree? A shadow that prevails for a while? No, it is the shadow of a bird in its flight—away flies the bird, and there is neither bird nor shadow.
Repent one day before thy death. There was a king who bade all his servants to a great repast, but did not indicate the hour. Some went home and put on their best garments and stood at the door of the palace; others said, ‘There is ample time, the king will let us know beforehand’. But the king summoned them of a sudden; and those that came in their best garments were well received, but the foolish ones who came in their slovenliness, were turned away in disgrace.
Iron breaks the stone, fire melts iron, water extinguishes fire, the clouds drink up the water, a storm drives away the clouds, man withstands the storm, fear unmans man, wine dispels fear, sleep drives away wine, and death sweeps all away—even sleep. But Solomon the Wise says: ‘Charity delivereth from death’.

III

FOUR shall not enter Paradise: the scoffer, the liar, the hypocrite, and the slanderer.
The cock and the owl both await the daylight. ‘The light’, says the cock, ‘brings delight to me; but what are you waiting for?’
Thy friend has a friend, and thy friend’s friend has a friend: be discreet.
He who is ashamed will not easily commit sin. Commit a sin twice, and you will think it perfectly allowable. There is a great difference between him who is ashamed before his own self, and him who is only ashamed before others.
The sun will go down all by himself, without thy assistance. Not what thou sayest about thyself, but what others say. He who humiliates himself will be lifted up; he who raises himself up will be humiliated. Whosoever runs after greatness, greatness runs away from him; he who runs from greatness, greatness follows him.
If the young tell thee, Build; and the old tell thee, Destroy—follow the counsel of the elders; for often the destruction of the elders is construction, and the construction of the young is destruction.



IV

‘FEAR God, as much as you fear man’, said Johanan ben Zakkai.80 ‘Not more?’ asked his pupils in surprise. ‘If you would but fear Him as much!’ said the dying sage.
The righteous are masters of their passions. Not so the wicked: they are the slaves of their desires. The righteous need no monuments: their deeds are their monuments. The righteous promise little and do much; the wicked promise much and do not perform even a little. Let thy yea be yea, and thy nay be nay.
In Palestine it was considered a sign of descent from a good family if any one first broke off in a quarrel. The greatest of heroes is he who turneth an enemy into a friend.
Giving is not the essential thing, but to give with delicacy of feeling. Scripture does not say, ‘Happy is he who giveth to the poor’, but, ‘Happy is he who wisely considereth the poor’. He who makes the sorrowful rejoice will partake of life everlasting.
As the ocean never freezes, so the gate of repentance is never closed. The best preacher is the heart, the best teacher time, the best book the world, the best friend God.
He who curbs his wrath, his sins will be forgiven. Whosoever does not persecute them that persecute him, whosoever takes an offence in silence, he who does good because of love, he who is cheerful under his sufferings, they are the friends of God, and of them the Scripture says, ‘But they that love Him shall be as the sun, when he goeth forth in his might’.


Excerpt From A Book of Jewish Thoughts By Joseph Herman Hertz

Humility - Abraham Ibn Ezra - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

Humility - Abraham Ibn Ezra - A Book Of Jewish Thoughts

HUMILITY

THE man who does good works is more likely to be overtaken by pride in them than by any other moral mischance, and its effect on conduct is injurious in the extreme. Therefore, among the most necessary of virtues is that one which banishes pride; and this is, humility.
First among the signs by which the meek are known is that when misfortunes come to them their endurance triumphs over their fear and grief, and they willingly submit to the decree of God, and own that His judgements are righteous.
In matters of justice, however, the meek will be high-spirited and fearless, punishing the wicked without fear for favour. He will help the oppressed and rescue him from the power of the oppressor.
BACHYA IBN PAKUDAH, 1040.

AT all times let a man fear God as well in private as in public, acknowledge the truth, and speak the truth in his heart; and let him rise early and say: Sovereign of all worlds! Not because of our righteous acts do we lay our supplications before Thee, but because of Thine abundant mercies.
DAILY PRAYER BOOK.

WISDOM begetteth humility.
ABRAHAM IBN EZRA, 1167.




Excerpt From A Book of Jewish Thoughts By Joseph Herman Hertz