Winter Pea Soup - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Jewish Manual

Winter Pea Soup - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Jewish Manual



WINTER PEA SOUP.



Soak a quart of white peas in water, boil them till soft, in as much water as will cover them, pass them through a sieve, and add them to any broth that may be ready, a little piece of chorissa or smoked beef will improve the flavour; this soup should be served with mint and fried bread.



Excerpt From –  The Jewish Manual Practical Information In Jewish And Modern Cookery With A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints Relating To The Toilette By Judith Cohen Montefiore 

Summer Pea Soup - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Jewish Manual

Summer Pea Soup - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Jewish Manual



SUMMER PEA SOUP.



Take a peck of peas, separate the old from the young, boil the former till they are quite tender in good stock, then pass them through a sieve, and return them to the stock, add the young peas, a little chopped lettuce, small pieces of cucumber fried to a light brown, a little bit of mint, pepper, and salt; two or three lumps of sugar give a fine flavor.



Excerpt From –  The Jewish Manual Practical Information In Jewish And Modern Cookery With A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints Relating To The Toilette By Judith Cohen Montefiore 

Curried Fish - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook

Curried Fish - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook

Curried Fish. Time—1 hour.

1 lb. cold cooked fish, 1 apple or stick of rhubarb, 2 oz. butter, 2 onions, 1 pint water or fish liquor, 1 tablespoonful curry powder, 1 tablespoonful flour, 1 teaspoonful lemon-juice or vinegar; salt and pepper to taste.
Peel and cut up the onions and apple, or rhubarb; fry till brown in hot butter. Add the curry powder, flour, salt and pepper, and stir the water or fish-liquor in gradually; boil this all up and simmer gently for half-an-hour, then add the lemon-juice or vinegar; strain, and return to the saucepan with the fish cut into neat pieces to get thoroughly hot. Serve the curry in a border of boiled rice.

Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Fish Stewed White - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints

Fish Stewed White - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints



FISH STEWED WHITE.




Put an onion, finely chopped, into a stew-pan, with a little oil, till the onion becomes brown, then add half a pint of water, and place the fish in the stew-pan, seasoning with pepper, salt, mace, ground allspice, nutmeg, and ginger; let it stew gently till the fish is done, then prepare the beaten yolks of four eggs, with the juice of two lemons, and a tea spoonful of flour, a table spoonful of cold water, and a little saffron, mix well in a cup, and pour it into the stew-pan, stirring it carefully one way until it thickens. Balls should be thrown in about twenty minutes before serving; they are made in the following way: take a little of the fish, the liver, and roe, if there is any, beat it up finely with chopped parsley, and spread warmed butter, crumbs of bread, and seasoning according to taste; form this into a paste with eggs, and make it into balls of a moderate size; this is a very nice dish when cold; garnish with sliced lemon and parsley.




Excerpt From –  The Jewish Manual Practical Information In Jewish And Modern Cookery With A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints Relating To The Toilette By Judith Cohen Montefiore 

Fish Pie - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook

Fish Pie - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook


Fish Pie. Time—20 minutes.

Cold cooked kosher fish of any kind, bread-crumbs, 2 oz. butter; pepper and salt to taste, fish-liquor or water.
Butter a pie-dish, sprinkle on it a layer of bread-crumbs, then a layer of fish broken up into pieces; some pepper, salt, and bits of butter; cover this with more bread-crumbs and bits of butter; pour on a little fish-liquor or water, and bake 10 minutes.

Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Fish Cake With Potatoes - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook

Fish Cake With Potatoes - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - The Economical Jewish Cook

Fish Cakes. Time—½ hour.

1 lb. cold cooked fish, ½ lb. potatoes, 2 oz butter, 2 eggs; pepper and salt to taste.

Use any remains of cold fish, or boil some fish. Cold potatoes may also be used instead of boiling fresh ones. Mash the potatoes, add the pieces of fish broken up small, the yolk of one egg, the butter melted, and salt and pepper to taste. Form the mixture into balls with a tablespoon, flatten them into cakes 17brush over with beaten egg, toss them in bread-crumbs, and fry in oil. This mixture may also be made into a large fish-cake, by putting it into a greased tin and baking it in the oven about ¼ hour.

Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Baked Haddock - Fish - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints

Baked Haddock - Fish - Kosher Recipes And Cooking - Jewish Food Cuisine - A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints


BAKED HADDOCK.



Carefully clean a fresh haddock, and fill it with a fine forcemeat, and sew it in securely; give the fish a dredging of flour, and pour on warmed butter, sprinkle it with pepper and salt, and set it to bake in a Dutch-oven before the fire, basting it, from time to time, with butter warmed, and capers; it should be of a rich dark brown, and it is as well to dredge two or three times with flour while at the fire, the continual bastings will produce sufficient sauce to serve with it without any other being added.
Mackarel and whiting prepared in this manner are excellent, the latter should be covered with a layer of bread crumbs, and arranged in a ring, and the forcemeat, instead of stuffing them, should be formed into small balls, and served in the dish as a garnish.
The forcemeat must be made as for veal stuffing, with the addition of a couple of minced anchovies, cayenne pepper, and butter instead of suet.


Excerpt From –  The Jewish Manual Practical Information In Jewish And Modern Cookery With A Collection Of Valuable Recipes And Hints Relating To The Toilette By Judith Cohen Montefiore