Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Getting And Growing Beautiful, Heavy Eyebrows Naturally | Time Honored Tips



Getting And Growing Beautiful, Heavy Eyebrows Naturally | Time Honored Tips


Getting And Growing Beautiful, Heavy Eyebrows Naturally | Time Honored Tips


The eyebrows must be kept well brushed, and by persistent care can be pinched into graceful lines. 

A heavy eyebrow can be trained with really little effort. The brush should be small and rather stiff and firm. It will at once cleanse and invigorate.

I cannot approve of penciled eyebrows. A professional in the “make-up” art can touch the eyebrows here and there and bring a marvelous change. 

But for the ordinary amateur it is better left undone. Besides, if coloring is applied, it is only a short time before the hair will fall out. And then won’t you look pretty?

Eyebrows that meet over the nose are really very disfiguring, and the cure is so simple that there is no need of this blemish, providing, of course, that one can afford to take the necessary treatment. 

Getting And Growing Beautiful, Heavy Eyebrows Naturally | Time Honored Tips
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The electric needle is the only sure and certain cure, and two sittings will be sufficient to remove them for good and always. 

Be sure that you patronize only the best operator, as you will surely regret it if you don’t.

Sage tea, with a few drops of alcohol added, will darken the eyebrows without injury. Coconut oil makes an excellent tonic to increase the growth.


Excerpt From – Woman Beautiful By Helen Follett Stevans


Quireda Bath Bags Recipe For A Fresh Skin Complexion And A Refreshing, Restorative Bathing Experience | Time Honored Tips



Quireda Bath Bags Recipe For A Fresh Skin Complexion And A Refreshing, Restorative Bathing Experience | Time Honored Tips


Quireda Bath Bags Recipe For A Fresh Skin Complexion And A Refreshing, Restorative Bathing Experience | Time Honored Tips

“Even from the body’s purity, the mindReceives a secret sympathetic aid.”—Thomson.

Quireda Bath Bags Recipe:

  • One pound of fine oatmeal.
  • One-half quart of new clean bran.
  • Two-fifths pound powdered orris root.
  • Two-fifths pound almond meal.
  • One-fourth pound white castile soap, dried and powdered.
  • One ounce primrose sachet powder.


The road to beauty has never been better known than it was to the Greek and Roman women of centuries ago, yet they did not begin to have the resources in cosmetic arts that we have now. But they bathed incessantly, believing that cleanliness and health were the vital points in their endeavors to be lovely.


They went in for athletic games to a large degree, and thereby hangs the secret of well-developed figures and fine, stately carriage. Creamy lotions for the face, made mostly of almond oil and the oil of cocoanut, were their complexion solaces.



No doubt these beauties of the past centuries had more time than we for their baths and games, but nevertheless let us make a strong, stern effort to follow in the wake of their excellent teachings. Surely they proved the wisdom of them in their own incomparable beauty.


Quireda Bath Bags Recipe For A Fresh Skin Complexion And A Refreshing, Restorative Bathing Experience | Time Honored Tips





Speaking of baths reminds me of Mme. Tallien, the beautiful French woman, who lived in the time of the first Napoleon. She went in for baths galore. Let me tell you what she did.



She gathered together all the strawberries or raspberries that the corner grocery could supply. These were mashed to a pulp and the bathtub filled. In this Mme.



Tallien bathed until the idea of milk and perfumed baths appeared to her fancy. There were many absurd and useless fads those days as well as wise beautifying practices—just the same state of affairs as now confronts us.



How much more rational than Mme. Tallien’s notions were the methods of Diana of Poitiers, who, history tells us, was fresh and lovely at sixty-five! She left the berries and things to their rightful place, the breakfast table, and each morning took a refreshing bath in a big tub of clear rain-water.



There has nothing yet been found, even in this progressive age of electric elixirs and beautifying compounds, that can equal this old-time aid to loveliness.



With the delightfully convenient bath-rooms, that even the most ordinary apartment or flat has now, bathing is not a matter of trouble and bother, but is, instead, an invigorating pleasure. I believe firmly in the need of the daily bath.



Not the thorough scrubbing, mind you, but the quick sponging and the plunge. Let the thorough scrubbing be at least twice during the week, and the five-minute plunges on other days. Certain it is that one is much refreshed by the dipping luxury, and still more certain is the fact that in no other way can the flesh be kept healthy and firm.



To those who are robust enough to stand it, the cold bath is very good, but I would not advise it as a general thing for women. For actual cleansing warm water and pure soap are necessary.



The shock of cold water immediately closes the pores, and they then retain all the impurities that they should cast out. The temperature of the water for the daily tepid bath should be about seventy-five or eighty degrees, never more than that.



Whether or not the bath should be taken at night or in the morning is a question which each must decide for herself. While it has often been claimed that a bath at night will quiet the nerves and make one sleep sweetly, I have known many persons who found it an utter impossibility, as it caused them to be restless and wide-awake.



One reason why the bath before going to bed is desirable is that a soothing emollient can be applied to the face, neck and hands, and thus will the skin be whitened and beautified. After a warm plunge the pores of the skin are opened and in excellent condition to absorb a good skin food or a pleasant cream.



Bath bags are simply luxuries. They are pleasant ones, to be sure, but they should never take the place of the flesh brush. It is best to follow the scrubbing with a gentle washing with a bath bag, for the almond meal and the orris root will give a charming, velvety appearance to the skin.



They should never be used a second time, as the bran frequently becomes sour after a drying. So, if you are of an economical turn of mind, you will make your bath bags very small, just large enough to serve for one beauty bath.



A little starch thrown into the bath will sometimes whiten the skin. Salt is not cleansing at all, but is very invigorating and a pleasant tonic if one is worn out and languid. Turkish baths are splendid complexion-makers, but must not be indulged in too frequently.



If the skin is dry and feverish, a dry bath—or massage—with oil of sweet almonds will promote a healthy skin and bring about good circulation.



Constant bathing is the best remedy for excessive perspiration. But this is not really effective unless a little benzoin is added to the water, and the armpits well dried, and dusted with powder afterward.



A good bathing powder for this purpose is made of two and one-half drams of camphor, four ounces of orris root and sixteen ounces of starch. Reduce to a fine powder and tie in coarse muslin bags.



Remember that a coarse complexion, with black, disfiguring, open pores, can be almost entirely cured by keeping the pores of the body free from sebaceous matter. Have the bathtub carefully scoured each day, as the oils and dust washed from the body invariably collect on the sides just where the water reached.



For the thorough cleansing have the tub half filled with warm water. Use a coarse rag, a bath brush and large, coarse towels. Before stepping into the water wash the face and neck well with castile soap and a camel’s-hair brush, this being particularly necessary when the pores are clogged and acne has formed.



Rinse thoroughly and dry with gentle pats. When using the brush, do not forget to let the scrubbing go well down onto the chest, lest your neck will be bleached white and nice only part of the way.

Once in the tub, go over the body briskly with the flesh brush, using plenty of good soap and not being at all sparing of elbow grease. This scrubbing is very invigorating, for it exercises the muscles and stirs up one’s blood as well.



After the scrubbing use the bath spray, letting the water get gradually chilled. The drying should be brisk and quick, and a warm robe of some sort must be donned while the hair is being combed for the night, the teeth brushed and the face anointed with a pure home-made cosmetic.



Then go to bed. If you don’t find a prettier, fresher complexion with you next morning, then I’ll miss my guess, and will take up another occupation than that of doling out beauty advice.



Quireda Bath Bags Recipe:

  • One pound of fine oatmeal.
  • One-half quart of new clean bran.
  • Two-fifths pound powdered orris root.
  • Two-fifths pound almond meal.
  • One-fourth pound white castile soap, dried and powdered.
  • One ounce primrose sachet powder.



Dipped in tepid water and used as a sponge these bath bags make a velvety lather that softens and whitens the skin in a way that warms the cockles of one’s heart.



Excerpt From – Woman Beautiful By Helen Follett Stevans.

Homemade Recipe To Sweeten The Breath, Rinse The Mouth And Keep The Teeth Healthy | Time Honored Tips



Homemade Recipe To Sweeten The Breath, Rinse The Mouth And Keep The Teeth Healthy | Time Honored Tips  


Home Made Recipe To Sweeten The Breath, Rinse The Mouth And Keep The Teeth Healthy | Time Honored Tips


“Some ask’d how pearls did grow, and where? Then spoke I to my girl,To part her lips, and shew me thereThe quarrelets of pearl.”Herrick.
Home Made Recipe To Sweeten The Breath:

  • Alcohol, twelve ounces. 
  • Cinnamon, two and one-half drams. 
  • Ginger, one-half dram. 
  • Essence of peppermint, one dram. 
  • Cloves, one-eighth dram.
Femininity may be heir to many beauty woes, but ugly teeth is one trouble which is often caused by sheer neglect. How many of us can recall the days of childhood and girlhood without remembering the fibs we told to escape cleaning our teeth? 


The blessed mothers implored and begged and threatened and fussed, but we went our way joyful and serene, making all due preparations for future unhappiness. 


But when the girl began to think more about her personal appearance, and less of the frivolities of advanced babyhood—oh, that we were all back at that jolly time of life!—things were very different. The neglected teeth got good attention then, but often the mischief had already been done. 


I trust that the younger readers of this volume on beauty will remember that this is hopelessly true, and something not to be forgotten—like yesterday’s toasted marshmallows or to-day’s lesson in political economy.


Home Made Recipe To Sweeten The Breath, Rinse The Mouth And Keep The Teeth Healthy | Time Honored Tips




I have heard it said that too much brushing will injure the teeth, but don’t you believe it! The sooner you become accustomed to a moderately stiff brush, that will do its work well and thoroughly, the better. 


All foreign matter must be constantly removed, else decay will come as sure as fate. A perfect state of cleanliness cannot be unless the teeth have proper and constant attention. By this I do not mean that you must cease all other occupations and take up that of eternal scrubbing. Simply keep your teeth clean. 


Toothpicks must not be used excessively, cold water should not be applied—or very hot, either, for that matter—and all powders containing gritty substances must be tabooed. 

It is quite unnecessary for me to add that you must not bite thread or break nuts with your teeth, for all of us have had this bit of information dinned into our ears since the time when “little children should be seen and not heard” made life a worry and a care. 


I must confess, however, that I have seen women untie knots and do various bits of very remarkable mechanical work in this unique manner. My experience has been so broad in this particular line of observation that the expression “biting ten-penny nails” has never appeared to me to be much overdrawn.


If one seriously desires fine, beautiful, white teeth—and who doesn’t?—one must treat them well. Just before going to bed, give them a thorough cleaning, using waxed dental floss to remove any large particles which may be between them. 


Use only a pure powder, the ingredients of which you know. Be sure that all powder is well rinsed away. See that your brush is kept scrupulously clean. Upon arising in the morning rinse the mouth with diluted listerine. 


This makes an excellent wash, especially when the gums are tender and liable to bleed. Brush the teeth with tepid water. After breakfast, luncheon and dinner, wash them again, letting the last cleansing be the most searching and thorough. 


Once in a while it is wisdom to squeeze a little lemon juice onto the brush. This will remove the yellow appearance that often comes, and will also keep your teeth free from tartar.

Every six months visit your dentist and have your teeth thoroughly examined. The smallest cavities should be filled at once, and the pain will be less than when these agonizing crevices get so large that you feel that it’s a flip-up between going to a dentist or jumping into the lake. 


I know that most of us women are cowards when it comes to seances in dentist chairs, but all such things—like house-cleaning and writing letters to folks you don’t like, and entertaining your husband’s maiden aunt—all these things are heaps nicer when they’re well over with. 

They are the events which we prefer should ornament the past instead of the future.


Home Made Recipe To Sweeten the Breath:

  • Alcohol, twelve ounces. 
  • Cinnamon, two and one-half drams. 
  • Ginger, one-half dram. 
  • Essence of peppermint, one dram. 
  • Cloves, one-eighth dram.


Mix and leave in infusion for two weeks in a tightly covered vessel; filter and bottle. 
Put one teaspoonful in a glass of water, and rinse the mouth with this every morning.



Excerpt From – Woman Beautiful By Helen Follett Stevans.