Showing posts with label Lunch. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lunch. Show all posts

Thursday, July 8, 2021

How To Make Marble Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make Marble Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

MARBLE CAKE

Take two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, four eggs (yolks), one cup of milk, three cups of flour, and three teaspoons of baking-powder (scant). Cream the butter and sugar, and add the yolks of eggs. Then add the milk, flour, baking-powder, and the beaten whites of the eggs; flavor with lemon. To make the brown part; take a square of bitter chocolate and melt above steam, and mix with some of the white; flavor the brown with vanilla. Put first a tablespoon of brown batter in the pan, and then the white. Bake in quick oven thirty-five minutes.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

Wednesday, July 7, 2021

How To Make Cup Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make Cup Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

CUP CAKE

Cream one cup of butter with two cups of sugar and add gradually the yolks of four eggs, one at a time. Sift three cups of flour, measure again after sifting, and add two teaspoons of baking-powder in the last sifting. Add alternately the sifted flour and one cup of sweet milk. Add last the beaten whites of the eggs. Flavor to taste. Bake in loaf or jelly-tins.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Make Grafton Cake Layers And Small Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make Grafton Cake Layers And Small Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

GRAFTON CAKE LAYERS AND SMALL CAKES

Cream four tablespoons of butter with one and one-half cups of sugar, beat in separately two whole eggs, add one cup of milk alternately with two cups of flour in which has been sifted two teaspoons of baking-powder, beat all thoroughly.
This recipe will make two layer-cakes which may be spread with any of the cake fillings or icings.
To make small cakes omit one of the egg-whites, fill well-buttered gem pans a little more than half full, and bake in a moderately hot oven until a delicate brown. The white reserved may be beaten to a stiff froth and then gradually stir in four tablespoons of powdered sugar and the juice of half a lemon. When the cakes are cool, spread with the icing and decorate with raisins, nut meats, one on top of each or sprinkle with candied caraway seeds.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Make Little French Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make Little French Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

LITTLE FRENCH CAKES

Beat one-fourth cup of butter to a cream with one-fourth cup of sugar and add one cup of flour. Stir well and then add one egg which has been beaten into half a pint of milk, a little at a time. Fill buttered saucers with the mixture, bake and when done, place the cakes one on top of another with jam spread between.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Make A One Egg Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make A One Egg Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

ONE EGG CAKE

Cream one-fourth cup of butter with one-half cup of sugar, add sugar gradually, and one egg, well-beaten. Mix and sift one and one-half cups of flour and two and one-half teaspoons of baking-powder, add the sifted flour alternately with one-half cup of milk to the first mixture; flavor with vanilla or lemon. Bake thirty minutes in a shallow pan. Spread with chocolate frosting.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Make A Gold Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make A Gold Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

GOLD CAKE

Take one cup of powdered sugar, one-half cup of butter rubbed to a cream; add yolks of six eggs and stir until very light. Then sift two cups of flour with one and one-half teaspoons of baking-powder sifted in well (sift the flour two or three times). Grate in the peel of a lemon or an orange, add the juice also, and add three-quarters cup of milk alternately with the flour. Bake in moderate oven.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Make A White Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How To Make A White Cake | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

WHITE CAKE

Cream three-quarters cup of butter and one and one-quarter cups of sugar very well. Stop stirring, pour one-half cup of cold water on top of butter mixture and whites of eight eggs slightly beaten on top of water; do not stir, add one teaspoon of vanilla. Sift two and one-half cups of pastry flour, measure, then mix with two heaping teaspoons of baking-powder, and sift three times. Add to cake mixture and then beat hard until very smooth. Turn into ungreased angel cake pan, place in slow oven. Let cake rise to top of pan, then increase heat and bake until firm. Invert pan, when cool cut out.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How Much Time Various Cakes Take To Bake | A Time-Table For Baking Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

How Much Time Various Cakes Take To Bake | A Time-Table For Baking Cakes | Food For Shabbat | Kosher Recipes And Cooking | Homemade

TIME-TABLE FOR BAKING CAKES

Sponge cake, three-quarters of an hour.
Pound cake, one hour.
Fruit cake, three and four hours, depending upon size.
Cookies, from ten to fifteen minutes. Watch carefully.
Cup cakes, a full half hour.
Layer cakes, twenty minutes.


Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

General Directions And Rules For Baking Cakes | Homemade | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

General Directions And Rules For Baking Cakes | Homemade |  Kosher Diet Food Recipe

TO BAKE CAKES

Make sure the oven is in condition, it can better wait for the cake than the other way around.
Light your gas oven five or ten minutes before needed and reduce heat accordingly when cake is put in oven.
For the coal range, have the oven the right temperature and do not add coal or shake the coals while cake is baking.
If a piece of soft yellow paper burns golden brown in five minutes the oven is moderately hot; if it takes four minutes the oven is hot, if seven minutes is required the oven is fit for slow baking.
Sponge cakes require a slow oven; layer cakes a hot oven, and loaf cakes with butter a moderate oven.
Never look after your cake until it has been in the oven ten minutes.
If cake is put in too cool an oven it will rise too much and be of very coarse texture. If too hot, it browns and crusts over the top before it has sufficiently risen. If, after the cake is put in, it seems to bake too fast, put a brown paper loosely over the top of the pan, and do not open the oven door for five minutes at least; the cake should then be quickly examined and the door carefully shut, or the rush of cold air will cause it to fall. Setting a small dish of hot water in the oven will also prevent the cake from scorching.
When you think your cake is baked, open the oven door carefully so as not to jar, take a straw and run it through the thickest part of the cake, and if the straw comes out perfectly clean and dry your cake is done. When done, take it out and set it where no draft of air will strike it, and in ten minutes turn it out on a flat plate or board.
Do not put it in the cake box until perfectly cold. Scald out the tin cake box each time before putting a fresh cake in it. Make sure it is air-tight. Keep in a cool place, but not in a damp cellar or a refrigerator.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

General Directions And Rules For Making And Mixing Cakes | Homemade | Kosher Diet Food Recipe


General Directions And Rules For Making And Mixing Cakes | Homemade | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING CAKES

Use only the best material in making cake.
Gather together all ingredients and utensils that are required. If tins are to be greased, do so the first thing; some cakes require greased or buttered paper, if so, have paper cut the size that is needed and butter the paper.

All measurements are level. See "Measurement of Food Materials".
Use pastry flour. Sift flour twice at least and measure after sifting.
Measure or weigh the sugar, butter, milk and flour. In measuring butter always pack the cup so as to be sure to get the proper quantity. Use the half-pint measuring cup.

If fruit is to be used, wash and dry it the day before it is needed. Dust with flour just before using, and mix with the hand till each piece is powdered so that all will mix evenly with the dough instead of sinking to the bottom.

A few necessary implements for good cake making are a pair of scales, a wooden spoon, two wire egg-whips, one for the yolks and the other for the whites of eggs.
A ten-inch mixing-bowl, and two smaller bowls.
Two spatula or leveling knives.

A set of aluminum spoons of standard sizes.
For convenience, cakes are divided into two classes: Those containing butter or a butter substitute and cake containing no shortening.

The rules for mixing cakes with butter are:

Break the eggs, dropping each in a saucer or cup. If the whites and yolks are to be used separately divide them as you break the eggs and beat both well before using; the yolks until light and the whites to a stiff froth, so stiff that you can turn the dish upside down and the eggs will adhere to the dish.
Rub the butter to a cream which should be done with a wooden spoon in a deep bowl, add the sugar gradually. In winter set the bowl over hot water for a few minutes as the butter will then cream more easily. Add the yolks or the whole eggs, one at a time, to creamed butter and sugar. Sift the baking-powder with the last cup of flour, add flour and milk alternately until both are beaten thoroughly into the mixture, add beaten whites of eggs last to the dough and then set in the oven immediately.
Sponge cakes and cakes that do not contain butter and milk must never be stirred, but the ingredients beaten in, being careful to beat with an upward stroke. Separate the yolks of the eggs from the whites, and beat the yolks with an egg-beater until they are thick and lemon-colored. Then add the sugar, a little at a time, beating constantly. Now beat the whites until they are stiff and dry; add them; the flour should be added last and folded lightly through. Every stroke of the spoon after flour is added tends to toughen the batter. Bake at once. All sponge cakes and torten should be baked in ungreased molds.

Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

How To Can Your Vegetables | Useful Cooking And Housekeeping Tips

How To Can Your Vegetables | Useful Cooking And Housekeeping Tips



CANNED VEGETABLES

Only young, tender, fresh vegetables should be canned.
Time your work by the clock, not by guess.
Weigh and measure all material accurately.
Take no risks. 
Food is too valuable.

Most fruits and vegetables require blanching; that is, all vegetables and fruits, berries excepted, should be first plunged into boiling water or steam after being picked over, and then, in turn plunged at once into very cold water.

After blanching and packing in sterilized jars, add to all vegetables salt in the proportion of a level teaspoon to the contents of a quart jar. Carrots, parsnips and sweet potatoes require a teaspoon to the pint.

Then fill jars to within quarter inch of top with boiling water, and put in hot water bath—see "Canning Fruit in a Water Bath".

Cover boiler or kettle closely and sterilize or boil for the length of time given below:
Do not close jars tight during sterilizing, or there will be no room for the generated steam and it will burst the jars.

Asparagus, Beets, Carrots, Parsnips, Peas, Sweet Potatoes, and Turnips require six minutes blanching, ninety minutes sterilizing. Asparagus requires one hundred and twenty minutes.
Corn requires five minutes blanching on the cob; three minutes sterilizing after being cut from the cob, or on the cob.

Lima or String Beans or Peas require five minutes blanching; two hours sterilizing.
Pumpkin and Squash require five minutes blanching; one and one-half hours sterilizing.
Tomatoes require two minutes blanching; twenty-two minutes sterilizing.

Tomatoes and Corn require separate blanching, time given above, then ninety minutes sterilizing together. The acid of the tomatoes aids in preserving the corn.
Corn and Beans (Succotash) require ten minutes blanching, ninety minutes sterilizing.


Excerpt From The International Jewish Cook Book By Florence Kreisler Greenbaum
Blank CookBook To Write Your Recipes

Cocoanut Candy | Sweetmeat | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

Cocoanut Candy | Sweetmeat | Kosher Diet Food Recipe



Cocoanut Candy

Time—1 hour

Ingredients
1 large cocoanut
1 tablespoonful cocoanut milk
1 lb. brown sugar

Directions

Cut the cocoanut into small thin strips about half an inch long. 
Boil with the sugar and the milk from the nut, stirring all the time. 
Drop a little on to a wet board, and if it be sufficiently cooked, it will harden. 
When ready, form the mixture into round cakes with a tablespoon, and drop them on to a wet board as fast as possible.
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Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Ginger Lee | Sweetmeats | Shabbat Cooking | Kosher Diet Food Recipe


Ginger Lee | Sweetmeats | Shabbat Cooking | Kosher Diet Food Recipe

Ginger Lee 

Time—1 hour

Ingredients 
1¼ lb. ginger lee seed, 
1 lb. castor sugar, 
1 lb. honey, 
¼ lb. almonds.

Directions

Blanch the almonds and ginger lee seed the day before they are required. 
Pick the seed over well, put it into the oven until it is a light brown. 
Mix the sugar and honey well together, put them in a saucepan on the fire, let them remain till clear (about 20 minutes). 
Drop in the ginger lee seed and almonds, and stir well. 
Drop a spoonful on to a plate to see if it sets; when ready, thoroughly wet a board and rolling pin, roll out the mixture about one inch thick, cut it up, and put on a dish to cool.



Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Chocolate Caramels | Sweetmeats | Kosher Diet Food Recipe


Chocolate Caramels | Sweetmeats | Kosher Diet Food Recipe 

Chocolate Caramels

Time—¾ hour


Ingredients 
½ lb. grated chocolate, 
1 breakfastcupful brown sugar, 
¾ breakfastcupful milk, 
1 oz. butter, 
2 dessertspoonfuls golden syrup.

Directions

Stir all the ingredients over the fire until thick (from 20 to 30 minutes). 
When a little of the mixture, poured into cold water, becomes crisp and hard, the caramels are ready. 
Pour the mixture on to well-greased dishes, mark it into squares, and cut up as soon as possible.


Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen

Hints On Cleaning Kitchen Utensils - The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers

HINTS ON CLEANING KITCHEN UTENSILS

Saucepans should always be filled immediately after use, with hot water and soda. When they have stood some time, they must be scoured well, inside and out, with silver sand, well rinsed in hot water, and thoroughly dried in front of the fire. The lids must be wiped, and hung up separately.

Frying-pans should never be washed, but should be wiped thoroughly clean with soft paper immediately after use.

Tin vessels must be thoroughly washed in hot water, dried, lightly covered with whiting, and then rubbed bright with wash-leather.

Kitchen tables must be washed over with a wet cloth, sprinkled with silver sand, and thoroughly scrubbed, the way of the grain, with hot water and soda. All the sand must then be carefully wiped off with a damp cloth. Should the table be very greasy, damp fuller’s earth must be used instead of sand.

Pastry boards and wooden utensils must be washed over with a wet cloth, sprinkled with crushed soda and boiling water, then scrubbed well, the way of the grain, and dried with a cloth.

Knives must be placed in a jug, and covered with hot water as far as the haft, then wiped quite dry, cleaned with bath brick on a wooden board placed in a slanting position. When quite bright, the dust must be wiped off with a dry cloth.

The prongs of forks must be cleaned with a piece of rag dipped in bath brick.
Plates and dishes must be washed in hot water and soda, then rinsed in cold water, and left in the plate-rack to dry.


Excerpt From The Economical Jewish Cook A Modern Orthodox Recipe Book For Young Housekeepers By By May Henry And Edith B. Cohen